Consumer reviews and reports on scam companies, bad products and services
Adaptive Ink
Adaptive Ink ADAPTIVE Ink products STINK. Internet
9th of Apr, 2011 by User979076
Adaptive Ink products STINK.
I have been emailing their virtual No Customer Service department ever since I purchased their system last August 2010.
DO NOT BUY IT or I will sell you mine for $20.00 just to get rid of it.
Continuous conflict with my HP office pro 8500, it will not print, the 8500 continuously thinks its out of ink. You call or email Adaptive ink and they respond with this BS We have the same printer with no problems yea sure I am the only one out here with this problem.
I was on the HP support line for 3 days 14 hours trying to get this resolved. No Success
Do not buy the Adaptive Ink Products they are junk and the Customer service is nonexistent
Trust Me
Save your money
The product is JUNK!!!
Replace Adaptive Ink with regular HP Cartridges guess what everything works fine
Comments
3354 days ago by Adaptiveink
He just will not understand...OK, one more time Jim!

We have been working with Jim and he knows that we have a 30 day money-back warranty and a 1 year 100% guarantee on our products.

Jim's first issue is that he will not understand that when the smart chips on the cartridges count down they will no longer display ink volume. These HP 940/940XL cartridge smart chips cannot be reset. Furthermore, the smart chips DO NOT show the actual volume of ink inside the cartridge. The ink volume you see on your display, or software monitor display is an "Estimated ink level, actual levels may vary". To prove to everyone that these cartridges DO NOT show the level inside the cartridge do this simple test.
1. Take two 940/940XL cartridges of the same color, one brand new and the other one that is used from your printer that shows a ink level "estimated" near empty.
2. Remove the bottoms that have the smart chips on them by cutting the cartridge labels on both sides at cartridges two-piece parting line.
3. Unsnap the bottoms and swap the bottoms.
4. Place the brand new cartridge with the used bottom in your printer and shut the door. You will see that the new "FULL" cartridge shows the same level as the near empty used cartridge.
5. Now place the used cartridge with the "New" bottom into your printer. You will see that the used cartridge will show FULL.
The reason for this is the smart chip is programmed to count down to zero. Once it reaches zero it can no longer provide ink level information, BUT the cartridge will continue to work because printer manufactures can no longer disable the smart chip from printing (they lost a class action lawsuit on this a few years ago).

Jim is not just pressing the on/off button on his printer. He is removing the power to his printer through a power strip, or some other method. By removing power to the in-line power supply (that black box in the middle of your power cord, with a little green LED) you are completely removing power to the printers "memory" of its initial setup. This is why every time Jim turns power back on, the printer has to run through a setup to re-initialize the printer, re-prime the print heads (which may have not parked themselves properly to protect the print heads from drying out), and identify estimated ink levels. When he "cold-boots" his printer he gets these following errors that have to be bypassed to be able to begin printing again. Normally, this only has to be done one time when the smart chip goes to zero, or each time after the power is removed from the power supply for more than about a minute and its capacitance is completely drained. To prove this, try unplugging the power cord from the wall and watch to see how long the green LED stays on...put your eye up close to the LED, because it will continue to glow for awhile after it goes out. Once you plug it back in, the printer will need to run a full setup and you will print again. HP's support will have you do this as a debug procedure if you contact them. If our cartridges smart chips have reached zero, but you still have ink in them (the black rubber bulb has NOT sucked in) you will get these "warning messages":

Warming Up…(First message that scrolls across the display screen)
“The original HP ink in the following cartridge has been depleted: Color [X]. Information about ink levels will not be available. Press ? for more information.”

Press the forward arrow (?) to the right of the OK button.

Warming Up…(Second message that scrolls across the display screen)
“Printer failure or damage attributed to the use of non-HP or refilled ink cartridge will not be covered under warranty. Replace ink cartridge or press OK to continue.”

Press the OK button.

The reason Jim can "Replace Adaptive Ink with regular HP Cartridges guess what …everything works fine…" is because he is putting cartridges in the printer that the chips have not count down to zero.

Do this Jim. Take the bottoms off those cartridges and place them on our system...guess what, they will work just fine until they count down to zero. But guess what, after they have count down to zero they will act the same way if you shut the power off to your printer the way you are doing it now.

To resolve all of your issues Jim...DO NOT completely remove power to your printer with a power strip. Just turn the off/on switch off and on. This way you will not have to do the bypass of the warning messages every single day!

If we did not have customer support, we would not spend the time to continue to TRY and educate. If you go to our website, you will find that we provide more information then anyone out there with our FAQ's page http://adaptiveink.com/faqs.html for these printers...if people would just read!
3336 days ago by Dijcks
Actually, I agree for the most part with the OP. I was one of the first owners of the Adaptive mini-pro units. I purchased 2 of them, having been taken in by the "design" and the promise of great results and service.
BOTH units has since FAILED. As always, the manufacturer will somehow try to lay blame on the end-user AND also remember you WILL have to buy new ink cartridges at some point due to HP's "expiration date" time-out on the cartridges.
.
I've been refilling, and/or using CIS/CISS products for several years, and the best success came from Epson-based ink products. Epson products (at least the ones I owned) work well with the chip reset units, and the corresponding inks.

There are TWO problems with HP. One, if you own an HP Officejet 8500 (and/or the like) you WILL be unhappy with the printer for a few reasons (remember, I own 3 of these printers).
NOT one of them works right. From paper handling, to ink usage, to the unbelievable amount of time they use up "cleaning" and re-calibrating etc., These printers are best,
1. taken back for a refund
2. thrown away.
3. given to an enemy.

BUT, this is about Adaptive. The fact that they are trying to make their product work in a piece of garbage puts them at a disadvantage, BUT, their customer service IS HORRIBLE. I'm a customer so I know.
When I asked for a replacement of my first failed CIS unit, I was FORCED to buy a "Better" one, which they argued, "you are really only paying for the new ink". I tried to point out that the original unit was only partially used up. Well, the new unit seemed like it would solve the problem and so I took yet another chance and purchased it.
Imagine how I felt after waiting weeks for it to arrive, when I opened the box, there were 4 bottles of refill-ink. IT took OVER 2 months of attempts to get the replacement and now it has FAILED also.
BE AWARE that the rubber fill ports WILL fall as 2 of them have now come off during my first refill attempt.
RUINED CARPETS, (my false sense of easy refilling), and ink everywhere.

In SHORT,
If you can get rid of your HP printer, do it, and find something else.. anything else.
If you are like me, "stubborn" and want to FORCE it to work, you will (like me) suffer.

You won't get anywhere with HP, and you won't get far with ADAPTIVE either, because they don't do this full time, and don't gracefully stand behind their products.

I will be posting a Youtube video of my recent refill attempt and let those who want to take a look, see for themselves what to expect if they want to force an HP printer to work with their CISS.

By the way, because HP printer ink cartridges are can't be reset, you will have all-manner of problems trying to send-receive faxes, or scan papers, etc.. When the ink "runs" out, the printer virtually shuts down.

The youtube video will be entitled ADAPTIVE INK CISS AND HP PRINTER
3000 days ago by DisappointedwithHP
Dijcks,
I am one of those stubborn owners of an HP 8500 and have bought a CISS system for it. I have tried EVERYTHING to get it to work, but it just continues to count pages printed (or whatever the evil machine does), then goes though the "getting low" to "out of ink" even though the CISS system continues to supply ink.
No shutting it down, unplugging it, no air bubbles, no pinched tubes.
No one should be allowed to sell empty anything for this piece of crap printer!
Now I have let all the out...you said you have 3 printers. I print a MASSIVE amount, thus the reason for buying a CISS.
Would you have a printer/CISS you would recommend? I need to be able to print picture quality form time to time.
Thanks for any help! As soon as I get a new printer (it would be nice to have a scanner/fax on it as well) I will let my boys have this one for target practice! Ciss and all!!
2988 days ago by Dijcks
Hello DisappointedwithHP!
Just by chance I saw this post of yours. There are no reliable CISS products for this particular printer that I am aware of. Reason? The OEM chips cannot be reset, OR, nobody has made a tool to reset them, and so this printer will always be troublesome when ink is completely depleted (on the chips). To be honest, the print quality for photos is horrible anyways. I have an Epson 280 printer with CISS ink that prints great pics and it's a lot older than the HP.
I'm not sure why HP has not been sued via Class Action over this printer. Later versions of it are much better, and the chips can be turned off on those units, making CISS a better fit.

Getting back to Adaptive. I'm surprised they are still selling products. For a small company, they have tons of complaints and I can only surmise that their other versions of CISS are better, hence not the Mini Pros that I have purchased.

Good luck with your pursuits in printing!
Ron Dijcks

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